Tag: IoT

Top 5 Health IT Challenges for 2018

Posted by on January 31, 2018


Our mission is to deliver riveting digital experiences for our healthcare clients. A new year always inspires a fresh look, and 2018 will bring a new (as well as continuing) set of challenges for healthcare executives. If you want to know what healthcare leaders are most concerned about, just ask them. Surveyors for Managed Healthcare Executive and the PwC Health Institute did precisely that.

The 2 Surveys Disclosed 5 Challenges

This post summarizes 5 Health IT challenges healthcare executives say are still top of their hit parade.

Challenge #1. Using big data to improve quality and reduce costs continues to lag.

Only 12% of the survey responders reported that their organization is excelling in scooping up and harvesting all the data they generate and can harvest from other sources. While the percentage remains static from the 2016 survey, 46% of the respondents report they have come “a long way” in this area—up from 39% from last year.

Handicapping that progress is that, even though more healthcare data is generated, the information is scattered across multiple sources—patients, providers, and payers. There is no single source for healthcare data. Patients migrate between different health plans or providers, but the data does not follow them.

Most organizations do not have the technology to capitalize on big data. It is everywhere, but it is locked in silos with different formats and, again, from a variety of sources. To get at it, organizations need the big data technology infrastructure to get it, store it, and analyze it at a scale that is useable.

Our take on implications for healthcare clients: New ways to manage big data are growing at an explosive rate. It is all about aligning business goals with the technology. Rivet Logic’s big data solutions leverage the power of MongoDB to get a focused view of opportunities for cost reduction along with increases in productivity.

Challenge #2. Value-based Reimbursement Initiatives are lagging.

Value-based programs reward healthcare providers with incentive payments for the quality of care they provide to Medicare patients.  Organizations continue to struggle in this area because the traditional fee-for-service system does not mesh well to a metrics- and outcome-driven value-based care approach. Also, delivering value-based care requires new infrastructure, workflow, and information sources, which are vastly different from those already in place.

How Rivet Logic can help you to migrate from fee-for-service to value-driven value-based care: Improving the patient experience is at the core of value-based care. Organizations need better collaborative processes and tools and the right mix of tools, which promote transparency and better internal communication.

That communication relies on patient profile management and turning the customer experience into a single data gathering session, which does not have to involve information overlap in data silos.  For a detailed view of that process, download our data sheet to learn more about how address customer identity management.

Challenge #3. Patient experience must be a priority and not just a portal.

Just under half (49 percent) of provider executives reported that one of their top three priorities during the upcoming years will be revamping the patient experience. That effort will require healthcare organizations to “connect data points across and beyond the organization to understand how the patient’s experience fits” into the business.

Again, executives agree that it all centers around bringing in multiple data sets. It requires “governing them, establishing ownership, and utilizing them to provide a real time, actionable information about the patient.”

Connectivity is the key. The patient experience is being transformed by technology. A connected health system requires better engagement of everyone—providers, their employees, and, most importantly, the patient. Digital solutions, like patient portals and mobile applications are supplanting visits to the office. Patients can self-monitor their conditions and transmit diagnostics over their smartphones. For more insight on this challenge and how Rivet Logic can help with that connectivity, download our data sheet to learn more about enabling better care with a connected health system.

Challenge #4.  Securing the Internet of Things.

PwC predicts that there will be more cybersecurity breaches. So, hospitals and health systems need to be educated and prepared. PwC reported that 95 percent of the surveyed executives believed their organization is protected. However, only 36 percent had management access policies in place. Worse yet, only 34 percent could point to a cybersecurity audit process.

Managed Services is one solution. Rivet Logic provides a flexible and scalable array of automated processes, services, and on-demand infrastructure designed to reduce IT costs without sacrificing quality or security.

Challenge #5. Artificial intelligence will be a healthcare coworker.

Healthcare employees function best when automation takes over tiring, labor-intensive tasks. An average of 70 to 80 percent and  Business executives reported that they plan to automate routine paperwork, scheduling, timesheet entry, and accounting with AI tools. In fact, a whopping 75 percent of healthcare executives “plan to invest in AI in the next three years.”

Again, managed services provide the pathway to keeping up with developments in IT in an environment of an expected continuing shortage of healthcare professionals.

Join us March 5-9, 2018 at HIMSS18

Rivet Logic will be exhibiting at HIMSS18 in Las Vegas in the Connected Health Experience pavilion.  Discussions of approaches and solutions to the above-mentioned challenges–and much, much more–will be on the agenda, including:

  • Clinical Informatics & Clinician Engagement
  • Compliance, Risk Management & Program Integrity
  • Data Analytics/Clinical & Business Intelligence
  • EHRS
  • Health Informatics Education, Career Development & Diversity
  • HIT (Health IT) infrastructure & Standards
  • Improving Quality Outcomes Through Health IT
  • Patient Safety & Health IT
  • Privacy, Security & Cybersecurity

Digital Experience Platform Trends in 2018

Posted by on January 02, 2018


The digital experience has changed a lot throughout 2017 and it’s going to continue growing and expanding in 2018. Here are just a few of the trends that companies can expect — and that they should consider following.

The Digital Experience Will Become More Important

Digital Experience Platforms (DXP) are no longer optional, especially for large companies and companies with broad demographic reach. Once only seen in the largest of corporations, digital experience platforms are now filtering down to small-to-midsized businesses that need to remain competitive within their market spaces.

Throughout the last few years, user experience and customer journeys have become key. But many companies have not yet moved over to a unified digital experience. Digital experience platforms are going to become more popular and more important, as businesses work towards developing their strategies and making use of the large volumes of data they have collected.

An Increased Focus on Micro-Interactions

Micro-interactions make it easier to track buyers across their journey. By incentivizing customer progress and breaking up the journey into a multitude of small steps, an organization can better control the path that a customer travels. Smaller, incentivized steps make customers more likely to continue on the journey, in addition to making it easier to determine when customers lose interest and fail to convert.

Just a few years ago, scrolling “one page” displays became a popular method of delivering content media, as companies found that customers were compelled to continue their journey as long as new content was readily accessible. Similarly, micro-interactions feed a customer constant feedback regarding their interactions, thereby promoting continued interaction and avoiding situations in which the customer might have to wait.

Omni-Channel Consolidation

In order to optimize their processes, businesses need to consolidate their data. Companies can no longer track the multitude of different platforms and services their customers may use to interact with them. Consequently, omni-channel consolidation is going to become more popular, with as-a-service consolidation tools paving the path.

Subscription-based, cloud-based channel consolidation tools make it easier for organizations to manage all of their interactions with their customers, rather than seeing their interactions on a granular, per-platform basis. This gives a fuller picture of customer behavior, which leads to sharper, more accurate analytic data.

Agile Product and Service Development

Companies are going to need to pivot faster in 2018. In order to adjust their customer experience, they’ll also need to adjust their products and services in a rapid-fire way. Rather than a traditional, iterative production work-cycle, companies are going to find themselves balancing a lot of moving parts, constantly testing, improving, and optimizing their solutions.

This will create further need for advanced project management and data management suites, as companies are going to have to track not only the changes that they make to their environment and services, but also the results of these changes. Companies are going to have to become ready and willing to immediately respond to customer needs, creating not only responsive platforms but responsive cultures.

“Fog” Computing Will Give Rise to “Fog” Data

On the periphery of every network today are now Internet of Things devices. Not only are smartphones and tablets connected to networks, but so are televisions, coffee pots, and thermostats. These Internet of Things devices are going to broaden and expand in 2018, including wearable devices and augmented reality devices.

“Fog” computing is the term given to computing on these IoT devices, but these IoT devices will lead to something more interesting: fog data. Customers will be able to interface with a number of companies on their smart devices, and these companies will be able to transition the customer experience not only to the fog, but also the cloud.

Smart watches and augmented reality glasses will both represent opportunities for companies to continue to engage their customers, ushering in a new era of responsive devices. And just as companies today can take advantage of special phone features (such as native alerts), these IoT devices will come with additional functionality.

Overall, it’s all going to be about the data. Getting more data, processing it, and consolidating it — all to create a better user experience from start to finish.