Tag: content management

Why Your Business Needs Enterprise Content Management

Posted by on August 28, 2018

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Having the right business solution that will drive operations makes a difference in productivity and efficiency. As content continues to remain an integral part of an organization’s communication, marketing and sales strategy, learning how to properly manage this content is key.

Getting Down to Basics – Enterprise Content Management in a Nutshell

Enterprise content management (ECM) collects and organizes information that will be used by a specific audience. It combines a number of elements, such as methods, strategies and tools that capture, manage, store, preserve and deliver information to keep the organization running.

What are these elements, and how do they affect enterprise content management?

The following elements are needed for smooth processes. Let’s break it down:

  • Capturing information requires entering your content into the main system.
  • Management of this information is crucial, as it determines what can be found and used by the person who needs it.
  • Storing this information requires finding the right place within the system. Finding the right system and solution is key.
  • Preserving this information for long-term use makes a difference. It’s archiving and protecting information so it will be available whenever it is needed within the organization.
  • Delivering is putting the information into people’s hands when they need it.

Defining the structure of this content helps determine how it should be compartmentalized. There are a number of sources where content can be derived from, and proper management of these sources can protect your organization now and in the future. There are three types of content: structured, unstructured and semi-structured. This is how they differ:

Structured content

Structured content is well defined and is processed by computers, databases and is a factor in line-of-business solutions. It is comprised of independent parts that can be pulled together in a number of ways to get information needed for a particular purpose. Examples of structured content would be the different fields of a blog post, like the author name, title of the blog post, organization where the author is from, description of the post, meta data, and so forth. This information can then be used in a CMS. These elements are independent of one another, but can be used together.

Unstructured content

This type of content does not have a structure that is fully defined, and is read mostly by humans. Most of this information is produced by office applications such as presentation and word processing programs.

Semi-structured content

This information is between the other two types of content, and includes data that is processed by a computer, but have their own layouts, such as purchase orders, invoices and receipts.

Enterprise content management helps do business better. There are 5 top elements of ECM:

Digitally capturing documents

This includes documents that are created, captured, stored or shared through scanning, content that is already digital, filing and categorizing documents automatically, and electric forms. ECM helps capture these documents in a digital repository to eliminate challenges occurring from using paper.

Storing documents in a digital repository

ECM systems are used to store documents that are critical to business operations while being able to view or make edits, view metadata, and organize those documents in a structure that works. Additional features and benefits include duplicating existing file structures, making full-text searchable scanned and electronic files, direct documents where to go automatically when imported, preview content and navigate through thumbnails of documents. You can also save any changes you make with document check in and out.

The metadata system allows users to build document templates that can be used across documents and folders; create document fields that are reusable to note key document information, including the author and approval time; connect any related documents with attachments through document links; sign and validate documents with digital signatures; and track, display and compare various versions of documents.

Retrieve documents, regardless of location or device

An ECM will help you with finding documents with full-text search, identifying specific elements, words, or other identifiers, and use preset search options once the records have been securely stored. You can conduct a search identifying metadata, annotations or entry names to find the information you need.

Enterprise search helps increase efficiency, cutting down on the time needed to find information, answer requests and more. The need for manual tagging is removed, and users have visual images to quickly find documents without going through numerous files and folders. Users will be able to have the right information at the right time to make better decisions that impact the bottom line.

Automate processes

Some ECM systems have digital automation features that will help eliminate manual tasks to get better results within the organization. An automated process will help the document move through the system, acquiring all the necessary signatures and review needed. You will also be able to identify where any breakdown occurs.

Securing documents

ECM systems can help strengthen compliance risk and optimize records management, from the processes to protections. It can provide restrictive access to content, monitor who uses the system, creates documents, changes passwords, and protect sensitive data.

Integration

Although ECM systems were initially designed to capture, store, and manage content for administrative or financial purposes, it has evolved to include workflows, case management, business process management and enterprise search. ECM’s are often integrated with Web Content Management (WCM) systems or portals to create cohesive digital experience solutions ranging from corporate websites to intranets, social communities, customer portals, and more.

With a system in place like this, your organization will be able to run smoothly and efficiently. Enterprise content management is a viable solution for streamlining processes to focus on business productivity and growth, now and in the future.

Why You Should Use a CMS for Building and Managing Your Responsive Mobile Website

Posted by on March 08, 2018

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Imagine this scenario: one of your long-term customers pulls out his smartphone and types in your company’s website address. He wants to double-check the hours of operation as well as confirm service offerings. While this process should be simple — and he is expecting that it will be — it isn’t. The website is there, but the website’s graphics and written content (which work just fine on a PC), are jumbled together while viewed on a smartphone. The website also struggles to load completely. The customer is put-off (or maybe even annoyed), and your company’s image is on the line. The customer has to call in to confirm your business hours and services, which eats up valuable time for both customer service and the customer.

If the website had been responsive, though, it would have taken the customer a handful of seconds to look up the information, and the customer service agent would be free to move onto the next caller. If every other customer is calling because he or she wasn’t able to locate valuable company information on a smartphone or tablet, it could end up costing your company a lot of time and money in the long run.

But one thing could change all of that: a responsive (mobile-friendly) website designed with a CMS. Responsive websites are an easier and more cost effective alternative for businesses, small and large alike. It saves time and money because there will be fewer customer service calls and less time spent creating new web pages and tweaking native mobile apps. If you have an online inventory, it will also help streamline upload times and inventory management.

CMS Platforms Simplify the Responsive Design Process

A responsive website is designed to adapt to differing screen sizes and mobile platforms. This means it can recognize the screen size and mobile device your customer is using and respond to it, showing them different content based on what their device can handle. There are two ways you can build a responsive mobile website: by having a website developer custom-design it for you, or by using a CMS (Content Management System), which would do most of the legwork for you.

Modern CMS platforms allow you (or a website administrator) to not only design and build a responsive website, but to quickly and efficiently manage it. While it might take a website designer two or three hours to make a new webpage for your website — depending on how involved the webpage is, of course — it could take that same designer under one-quarter of the time to make it while using a CMS.

CMS’s have a GUI (Graphic User Interface), which facilitates quick and easy upload and creation of written content, graphics and photos, forms, blog posts, design elements, and more. While most of the time spent hand-coding goes into formatting (i.e. figuring out how and where to put certain elements and how to make them look presentable), a CMS allows the designer to format an element in mere minutes. CMS platforms pre-load most formatting and design elements, allowing the designer to simply click a few formatting buttons or options and upload as many images as needed. Those elements are automatically formatted to “fit into” the smartphone, tablet, laptop, or other device your customer is viewing it on. Designing and managing a mobile website has never been easier.

Using a CMS for Native Mobile Apps

A CMS can also be used for native mobile apps. Native mobile apps that are created and managed with a CMS offer the most reliable, mobile-friendly experience out there. Having the ability to change the functionality, design or content of a native mobile app can be done with ease through the CMS. Native apps designed with a CMS also make editing or tying in gestures, the camera, microphone, and other mobile-based functionalities more streamlined.

CMS Platforms Can Raise SEO Rankings, Too

If you can imagine that CMS’s simplify the management of a responsive website, you might also imagine that it makes Search Engine Optimization (SEO) easier and more impactful. It’s true: a CMS can not only simplify your SEO strategy, but it can actually raise your rankings. There are a lot of variables when it comes to SEO — page load time, user experience, keyword usage, how many “quality” webpages you have on your website — but you can boost your website ranking just by using a responsive CMS platform.

According to Google, a responsive website performs better in search rankings because it provides a better overall experience than a website that isn’t mobile friendly. And because a CMS has a better chance of providing a tried-and-true user experience that is (typically) free of coding errors, the user experience will stay the same across all new webpages, and your rankings will go up as a result. Using a CMS for a responsive mobile website makes SEO not only more foolproof, but it can allow your web designer to quickly optimize each and every element of every webpage on your site. Optimizing your company’s website for search rankings should be at the top of your mobile marketing strategy, and using an open-source CMS can help you get there quickly and more effectively.

Choosing the “Right” Open Source CMS

Now that you’ve decided that a CMS is the way to go, how do you choose the right one? Taking the time to research which CMS is best for your company’s needs is critical, but doing some research on which CMS is best for efficiency and a good mobile strategy is also important.

Rivet Logic offers industry-leading design and consulting experience in several CMS platforms, two of which are Liferay and Crafter CMS. Reach out to us for responsive website design insight, troubleshooting, consulting, and more. We can help you turn your company’s website into a mobile superstar.

DXP Series, Part II: DXP and the Customer Experience

Posted by on November 28, 2017

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Introduction

In Part I of our DXP Series, Is a Digital Experience Platform Right for My business, we highlighted how a digital experience platform (DXP) is a set of tools to manage the customer’s online experience.  According to Liferay, the obsession with customer experience is at the confluence of the following factors:

  • Customers interact with companies on a wide variety of digital channels (web, mobile, social media)
  • Customers demand and expect the same experiences they get from digital leaders like Google, Apple, and Facebook.
  • Social media has become the cheer- (and jeer-) leader as an unstructured way to talk as customers provide feedback and influence public sentiment.
  • Mobile devices are on the scene and immediate. They give companies additional ways to stay in touch with customers.
  • The ability to get deep customer insights provides targeting information for a single person and give that person an highly personalized experience. Those insights come through everything from analytics to scooping up big data on social media.
  • Digital technology evens the playing field. Startups can disrupt traditional industries. Think: Uber and Airbnd. Those upstarts can deliver a better customer experience. Those startups have easy access to a tool kit that becomes a platform, not just dispersed ad hoc applications.

9 pieces in the DXP toolkit

The DXP toolkit can be a platform based on a software bundle, suite, or a single piece of software.  We listed the most common platforms as follows:

  1. Content management—allowing non-technical users to fill and maintain your DXP
  2. Social media—going into the wilds and deeper into the user realm
  3. Mobile website integration—fitting your DXP to the small screens viewed by millions
  4. Portal or gateway—passage and security without the latter inhibiting the former
  5. Search functionality—finding what users are looking for so they will stick around
  6. Rich Internet Application tools (RIA)—enriching the user experience through motion and interactivity
  7. Collaboration and meetings—working together face-to-face where many heads are better than one
  8. Analytics—getting feedback and breaching the gateway to AI
  9. Backend management—maintaining the DXP behind the scenes

In this post we describe those platforms and explore ways in which DXP integrates its technologies, components, processes, data, and people. That integration explains why DXP is keeping up with the push for customer and employee engagement.

1. Content is king, but users must rule

A content management system (CMS) is an application or set of related applications used to create and manage digital content. Think of CMS as a kind of digital word processor or publisher that dumps content into your website. It is more than that, of course.

CMS makes it simpler for content creators—the people who really know the business–to manage a website without developer assistance. In larger enterprises with multiple users adding content on a regular basis, a CMS is the easiest way to keep the site content up-to-date and responsive to search engines. Your platform is only as good as its content and you need a user-friendly way to keep content current.

2. Social Media is a vast channel for exploitation

Plug in social media to a DXP and open your web portal to the data- (and customer-) rich world of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. Social media plays a vital part in any migration to DXP. Users want the option to configure their own social media sharing. In addition to the out-of-the-box social media capabilities that often come with modern DXP platforms, there are also a variety of plug-ins available that can further extend and customize these capabilities.

3. Mobile channels reach millions

Your DXP product may look good on the desktop computer screen, but without a mobile platform you are missing out on millions of mobile users. Mobile phones have migrated from voice communication devices to ubiquitous pocket computers. According to Statista, by 2020 there will be nearly 258 million smartphones in the U.S.

Add a mobile version of your DXP platform to fit the small screen and expand your marketing base exponentially. Again, customers expect their mobile applications to be as excellent and friendly as the hardware they use.

4. Portal or gateway access gives users a passport and the warm feeling of security

Web portal software can create the following interface points for DXP:

  • Customer portals to create transactions and access documents and information online
  • Partner/agent portals to help field agents, partners, and franchises become more effective by accessing proprietary and personalized information
  • Business process portals to access and track complex business processes

A cloud-based DXP needs a web portal that both locks out hackers and performs the handshaking crypto-rituals to open the locks.

5. Search functionality adds power to DXP web pages and applications

Pathways to built-in search functions handling customer queries are tools to win the race between customer engagement and the impatience of today’s users. Adding a search application to a DXP portal allows drill down. The drill down must go through content types, tags, as well as categories the user specifies to refine the search. The search application can be placed on a page or be a link to allow users to do a web page content search.

6. Rich Internet Application Tools supercharge DXP

RIAs are web applications having similar characteristics of desktop application software. They add functionality to DXP with tools like Adobe Flash, Java and Microsoft Silverlight. As the name implies, these tools provide a “richer” experience for DXP. RIAs provide movement, user interactivity, and more natural experiences for everyone accessing the DXP. Add a sense of time, motion, and interaction to a DXP, and the users will stick around and enjoy the experience.

7. Collaboration and meetings make the enterprise go ‘round

Collaboration suites can resonate with other DXP apps to promote excellence in communication. They are message boards for team discussions, blog platforms and meeting software to add to your inventory of rich content.

Use document management to collaborate, brainstorm, and produce quality content.  Plug in meeting software for worldwide, real-time worldwide, face-to-meetings and conferences with real colleagues and customers at a fraction of travel costs.

8. Analytics software provides an eagle-eyed view

The best way to improve user experience is to know who, how many, and the characteristics of those who visit your DXP.  You want to know how your site or service is performing, who is back-linking to you, and to be able to dig into gathered statistics for visitor regions.

Analytics also provides a dashboard view to do the business intelligence magic of process measurement and customer behavior. A DXP partnered with analytics is the foundation for moving to artificial intelligence.

9. Backend management is your behind-the-scenes DXP management tool

Backend technologies help you manage your DXP or web application, site server, and an associated database. Backend developers need to understand programming languages and databases. They also need to understand server architecture.

On the other hand, as they say, “There’s an app for that.” DXP users can access backend manager technology in the cloud through MBaaS offerings. 

Conclusion: DXP is not just an eclectic collection of software

The platforms described above can work together to solve the biggest challenge enterprises face in the digital age: customer obsession. Companies are undergoing digital transformation in every area from business process to customer analytics. DXPs can bring all that together and re-engineer business practices to be totally customer oriented.

Digital transformation is the challenge. DXP is the solution.

How Digital Experience Management Differs from Content Management

Posted by on October 12, 2017

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When considering Digital Experience Management and Content Management, it’s best to have a concrete definition of both terms to fully understand how they differ.

What is digital experience?

Digital experience includes a number of things, including communications, processes and products from every digital aspect that engages an audience. This includes wearables, use of the web and mobile devices, beacons and recognition. The information gathered is analyzed to provide insight into customer relationships, identity, and intentions as they interact with businesses and organizations. This helps determine how companies deliver these digital experiences for their customers for future success.

What is content management?

Content management is also known as CM or CMS. It involves the collection, acquisition, editing, tracking, access and delivery of both structured and unstructured digital information. This content includes business records, financial data, customer service data, images, video, marketing information and other digital information.

With content management, you create and manage content, finding ways to generate awareness across multiple channels to reach more people. While having content is good, it’s more about offering the entire “experience” to the user that will give them more enhanced, enriched engagement. Content Management Systems have continuously evolved, integrating contextual digital experiences. This requires a comprehensive and effective strategy, the right tools, the right approach, and most of all, the right technology. An optimal digital experience embraces all these elements to provide personalized, responsive, and consistent experiences for every user you engage.

How is this done?

Digital experience (DX) management works in conjunction with content management, but is more comprehensive and fulfilling to the user. Think about the different outlets that engage customers – websites, social media, microsites, text messages, mobile apps and more. All these elements offer a complete digital experience. The processes and technology that provide these customized, consistent experiences is the management of it all.

One of the best ways they differ is that in digital experience management, the distribution channels all have objectives to follow and limitations. These help drive specific requirements for content and how to manage it. For instance, your tone and CTA will be different based on the digital platform you use. Additionally, when interacting with content, users want personalized experiences based on analytics you have determined appropriate for that channel. This allows them to seamlessly interact within that experience.

Web publishing used to be the first line of engagement, but not anymore There are too many channels users interact with that require ways in which publishers can gather feedback to quickly adjust their content. Without this management model in place, the system will not work.

Tools of the trade

There are a number of tools and systems to manage the digital experience. There are options for advanced analytics, to enhanced marketing tools that manage content based on channel. There’s also an emerging breed of Digital Experience Platforms (DXP), which provide businesses with an architecture for delivering consistent and connected customer experiences across channels, while gathering valuable insight and digitizing business operations.

When you have systems that work well together, being able to track successes becomes easier. When determining which tools will work best, you may want to start with product mapping. As a basis, the digital experience tool should include a combination of inbound marketing automation, analytics, and content management. Getting a system developed to meet all your needs is key.

As different avenues of engagement now drive the customer experience rather than the web, delivering a comprehensive and holistic experience is key. The digital experience is more complete, diverse and authentic – future thinking, while integrating content is how it should be done.

Optimizing Your Customer Experience Management

Posted by on August 15, 2017

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A customer’s experience with your organization may, in fact, be more important than the quality of either your products or your services. Customers today want to feel valued — they want to be able to have their needs both anticipated and fulfilled. Improving upon and optimizing your customer’s experiences is called customer experience management. Through new technologies, there are many ways that you can improve upon your customer experience management and, additionally, your ROI.

Integrate Your CRM, Marketing Automation, and Media Solutions Into a Single Infrastructure

Optimizing customer experience begins with consolidating and analyzing your data. To that end, integrating your CRM and marketing solutions can be an incredibly effective first step. Comprehensive CRM and marketing automation solutions — such as Salesforce, Marketo and HubSpot — almost universally come with third-party integrations out-of-the-box. For more distinct infrastructures, APIs, importing and exporting, or custom programming may be required. Regardless, this will create a single infrastructure that contains all of your customer information.

Not only does this improve analytics, but it also improves customer care overall. Both customer service representatives and sales personnel will have all of the information they need to quickly service the customers and get them the information that they need. Marketing campaigns will be able to target customers based on their prior behaviors — and will be able to prompt them towards purchasing more effectively.

Develop an Omni-Channel Approach through Content Management Systems

Content Management Systems (CMS) make it easier to push content directly to a multitude of different channels. Social media, email marketing, and websites can all be consolidated under a single content system — so that a single push of the button can update customers on a variety of platforms. Omni-channel approaches make it easier to scale your organization upwards and to reach out to individuals across multiple demographics and interests. Through regular content distribution, companies can achieve better organic growth and improve upon their inbound marketing.

A CMS is particularly useful for lead procurement and demand generation. With the use of a CMS, a strong and strategic digital marketing campaign can ensure that leads come to the business rather than the business having to procure leads. Organizations are thus able to improve upon their ROI, extend their marketing reach, and refocus their budget to additional areas of advertising and support.

Explore Big Data, Such as Emotional Analytics and Predictive Intelligence

Emotional analytics and big data can work together to develop new strategies for customer acquisition and retention. Algorithms are now available that are substantially advanced that they can look at patterns of customer behavior and determine the best way to service that customer. At its most complex, emotional analytics can involve motion capture and facial analysis, in order to detect micro-expressions that may aid in detecting the customer’s emotional state. But this isn’t the type of analytics that would most commonly be used by a business. Businesses, instead, would most likely use text-based analysis or verbal analysis, to detect the best leads based on their word usage and the amount of emotive statements they have made.

Not all big data is so complex. Predictive intelligence can also be much simpler, such as looking at a customer’s past purchases and predicting when they will need to make further purchases. Predictive intelligence is used to fantastic effect on many e-commerce marketplaces, to suggest items that may be relevant to the consumer based on the items that they have either purchased or browsed. Predictive intelligence can also be used to detect and identify certain patterns, such as whether a customer may have abandoned a shopping cart due to high shipping charges.

Create Knowledge Management Systems for Superior Customer Service

Customers today often prefer to self-service. A solid customer service experience is, thus, often one in which the customer does not need to contact the organization at all. New help desk and support solutions can be nearly entirely automated, so that customers can get the answers they need out of a knowledge management system. This management system may take the form of a helper website or even a live chat with a bot. When self-service fails, customers prefer a variety of ways to communicate: through email, phone, instant messaging, or even text message.

By providing these additional resources for customers, organizations not only assist the customer in getting what they want, but also reduce their own administrative overhead. The more customer service can be automated, the less time and money the organization has to sink into technical support and customer service personnel.

It’s an exciting time for organizations looking to improve upon their customer experience. Through better customer experience management, companies can fine-tune their operations and ensure that their customers keep coming back.

Learn About Everything Alfresco at DevCon 2011

Posted by on October 21, 2011

It’s that time of year again, when Alfresco enthusiasts get together to learn what’s new and network with other community members at the annual Alfresco developer conference.

This year, Alfresco DevCon Americas will be held in San Diego, CA on Oct. 26-27th, and will feature two packed days of Alfresco technical sessions delivered by some key engineers and visionaries behind the technology. The agenda includes tracks on Alfresco as a Platform, Best Practices, Customizing Alfresco, Case Studies, BPM, and Building WCM Solutions with Alfresco. The conference will also discuss all of the new features in Alfresco 4.0 – Share extensibility, Activiti, and Solr.

And of course Rivet Logic will be participating as a sponsor. We will also be presenting under the “Building WCM Solutions with Alfresco” track, on the topic of extending Alfresco for next generation WCM with our Crafter Studio extension.

For more information and to register, please visit, http://www.amiando.com/alfresco-devcon-san-diego-2011.html.

Content.gov 2011 – The Government and Open Source Content Management

Posted by on January 13, 2011

Alfresco is kicking off 2011 strong with Content.gov, a free, special one day event in downtown Washington DC focusing on open source content management in the government and public sector agencies. The event will be held on January 20th, 2011 at the Washington Marriott at Metro Center.

There’s been a long-time conception that government agencies are slow to adopt emerging technologies including open source products. However, in recent years, open source adoption has rapidly increased in the commercial sector due to a combination of factors, from the down economy and enterprises seeking cost saving alternatives, to the maturity of open source products finally proving themselves in areas of quality, security, and flexibility. The government, while slow to follow, are now beginning to realize the true benefits of open source software.

Content.gov 2011 will feature John Newton, Alfresco CTO & Founder, as the keynote speaker, followed by customer case studies delivered by actual customers and Alfresco implementation partners.

Rivet Logic will present a customer case study featuring a guest speaker from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The presentation will cover how Rivet Logic helped NAS implement an open source Alfresco WCM solution that helped streamline operations, resulting in faster publishing cycles, increased productivity, richer site experience, and better accountability.

For more information and to register, click here.

2011 Alfresco Lunch & Learn Series Introduces Social Content Management

Posted by on December 15, 2010

The holidays are upon us, but that’s not slowing Alfresco, or Rivet Logic, down. Alfresco has already scheduled its first Lunch and Learn series for 2011, taking place in January and February across major cities nationwide, and Rivet Logic is participating in three of them. The topic of this Lunch and Learn? Social Content Management.

The enterprise content management (ECM) market has undeniably evolved over the years. ECM products started incorporating collaboration features (i.e. blogs, wikis, forums, shared work spaces) when Web 2.0 technologies drove organizations to adopt Enterprise 2.0 to enhance collaboration in the work place. Now, with the boom of social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, enterprise content is becoming more social in nature. With millions of pieces of content being generated and circulated every day, ECM can’t stay the same.

So what does this new category of Social Content Management really mean, and how can Alfresco and Rivet Logic help? How can organizations take advantage of social business software, while still maintaining control of its content? Join us at one of the upcoming Lunch and Learn events to learn about these topics and find out why Gartner has identified Alfresco as a key player in this new space.

Rivet Logic will be hosting the following Lunch and Learn events:

Wed, Jan 19 – Los Angeles, CA
Thu, Jan 20 – Irvine, CA
Tue, Jan 25 – Raleigh, NC

To find out more and for a complete list of cities, click here.

Rivet Logic Named in KMWorld’s “100 Companies That Matter in Knowledge Management”

Posted by on March 02, 2009

KMWorld, the leading information provider serving the knowlege, document, and content management systems market, has selected Rivet Logic in their list of “100 Companies That Matter in Knowledge Management” for 2009.

The announcement was made yesterday by Hugh McKellar, editor in chief of KMWorld.

“We have always maintained that knowledge management is an attitude, not a specific application—a commitment to taking full advantage of all the information at an organization’s disposal and delivering it to the appropriate constituencies to facilitate decision-making at every possible level…

…We believe that each of the companies listed embodies as part of its culture the agility and limber execution of its mission… they embrace a spirit of innovation and adaptability. They each embody the resiliency and wisdom to identify and act upon their own areas requiring improvement and, more importantly, those of their customers.”

We’re honored to receive this prestigious recognition. As leaders in the open source enterprise content management and collaboration market, we will continue to strive to deliver bottom-line results for our customers.