Why You Should Use a CMS for Building and Managing Your Responsive Mobile Website

Posted by on March 08, 2018

responsive-web-design

Imagine this scenario: one of your long-term customers pulls out his smartphone and types in your company’s website address. He wants to double-check the hours of operation as well as confirm service offerings. While this process should be simple — and he is expecting that it will be — it isn’t. The website is there, but the website’s graphics and written content (which work just fine on a PC), are jumbled together while viewed on a smartphone. The website also struggles to load completely. The customer is put-off (or maybe even annoyed), and your company’s image is on the line. The customer has to call in to confirm your business hours and services, which eats up valuable time for both customer service and the customer.

If the website had been responsive, though, it would have taken the customer a handful of seconds to look up the information, and the customer service agent would be free to move onto the next caller. If every other customer is calling because he or she wasn’t able to locate valuable company information on a smartphone or tablet, it could end up costing your company a lot of time and money in the long run.

But one thing could change all of that: a responsive (mobile-friendly) website designed with a CMS. Responsive websites are an easier and more cost effective alternative for businesses, small and large alike. It saves time and money because there will be fewer customer service calls and less time spent creating new web pages and tweaking native mobile apps. If you have an online inventory, it will also help streamline upload times and inventory management.

CMS Platforms Simplify the Responsive Design Process

A responsive website is designed to adapt to differing screen sizes and mobile platforms. This means it can recognize the screen size and mobile device your customer is using and respond to it, showing them different content based on what their device can handle. There are two ways you can build a responsive mobile website: by having a website developer custom-design it for you, or by using a CMS (Content Management System), which would do most of the legwork for you.

Modern CMS platforms allow you (or a website administrator) to not only design and build a responsive website, but to quickly and efficiently manage it. While it might take a website designer two or three hours to make a new webpage for your website — depending on how involved the webpage is, of course — it could take that same designer under one-quarter of the time to make it while using a CMS.

CMS’s have a GUI (Graphic User Interface), which facilitates quick and easy upload and creation of written content, graphics and photos, forms, blog posts, design elements, and more. While most of the time spent hand-coding goes into formatting (i.e. figuring out how and where to put certain elements and how to make them look presentable), a CMS allows the designer to format an element in mere minutes. CMS platforms pre-load most formatting and design elements, allowing the designer to simply click a few formatting buttons or options and upload as many images as needed. Those elements are automatically formatted to “fit into” the smartphone, tablet, laptop, or other device your customer is viewing it on. Designing and managing a mobile website has never been easier.

Using a CMS for Native Mobile Apps

A CMS can also be used for native mobile apps. Native mobile apps that are created and managed with a CMS offer the most reliable, mobile-friendly experience out there. Having the ability to change the functionality, design or content of a native mobile app can be done with ease through the CMS. Native apps designed with a CMS also make editing or tying in gestures, the camera, microphone, and other mobile-based functionalities more streamlined.

CMS Platforms Can Raise SEO Rankings, Too

If you can imagine that CMS’s simplify the management of a responsive website, you might also imagine that it makes Search Engine Optimization (SEO) easier and more impactful. It’s true: a CMS can not only simplify your SEO strategy, but it can actually raise your rankings. There are a lot of variables when it comes to SEO — page load time, user experience, keyword usage, how many “quality” webpages you have on your website — but you can boost your website ranking just by using a responsive CMS platform.

According to Google, a responsive website performs better in search rankings because it provides a better overall experience than a website that isn’t mobile friendly. And because a CMS has a better chance of providing a tried-and-true user experience that is (typically) free of coding errors, the user experience will stay the same across all new webpages, and your rankings will go up as a result. Using a CMS for a responsive mobile website makes SEO not only more foolproof, but it can allow your web designer to quickly optimize each and every element of every webpage on your site. Optimizing your company’s website for search rankings should be at the top of your mobile marketing strategy, and using an open-source CMS can help you get there quickly and more effectively.

Choosing the “Right” Open Source CMS

Now that you’ve decided that a CMS is the way to go, how do you choose the right one? Taking the time to research which CMS is best for your company’s needs is critical, but doing some research on which CMS is best for efficiency and a good mobile strategy is also important.

Rivet Logic offers industry-leading design and consulting experience in several CMS platforms, two of which are Liferay and Crafter CMS. Reach out to us for responsive website design insight, troubleshooting, consulting, and more. We can help you turn your company’s website into a mobile superstar.

Trackbacks

Trackbacks are closed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>