Category: ECM

Alfresco is the Answer to Documentum’s Future Uncertainty

Posted by on December 13, 2016

Managing enterprise content is something that many organizations struggle with. Digital content is around us everywhere we go; enabling secure, enterprise-wide access to that content is critical for any business to remain competitive. Organizations often find themselves turning to Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solutions to help address these business challenges.

However, not all ECM systems are created equal. As the ECM and digital landscape have evolved, modern ECM solutions are offering many benefits that their legacy counterparts lack, including more out-of-the-box functionality, platform flexibility, ease of integration, open standards, and cost savings. If your existing ECM has become too costly to maintain or no longer aligns with your IT strategy, then it’s a good idea to start looking at alternative options.

In particular, if you’re a current Documentum customer, then you’re probably also aware of OpenText’s recent acquisition of Dell EMC’s Enterprise Content Division (ECD), which may have you wondering how the acquisition will impact you and your business. Will investment and innovation stall as Documentum products gets absorbed into a crowded portfolio of products? Will the people behind the products stay involved and remain there to help?

One alternative to consider is Alfresco, which provides a modern platform that can really help you to accelerate Digital Transformation initiatives and move from older technologies in a way that makes sense to your business.

Did you know that Documentum co-founder John Newton also co-founded Alfresco? While the two products have similar roots and both offer robust content management, collaboration, Records Management (RM), and Business Process Management (BPM) capabilities, there are also many differences that make Alfresco a more attractive option for better long-term ROI.

Here’s a quick breakdown of how the two platforms differ:

Alfresco Documentum
Technology
  • Modern infrastructure supporting open standards
  • Proprietary infrastructure relying on aging technology
Pricing
  • Software subscription model with no software purchase cost
  • No vendor lock-in: Flexibility in choosing system integration partners for solutions
  • Traditional software purchase fee with maintenance costs
  • Vendor lock-in: Solutions & add-ons can only be implemented through pricey Documentum consulting
Out-of-the-box Features
  • More robust set of features available out-of-the-box leveraging best-of-breed open source components
  • Integrated enterprise search through Solr and Collaboration through Share
  • Additional features available as add-ons for extra cost
  • Enterprise search requires additional installation & configuration; Collaboration available through third party integration offerings
Integration
  • Easy integration with third party systems through a variety of industry standard protocols (CMIS, REST, CIFS, FTP, WebDAV, etc.)
  • Difficult integration through a proprietary web services layer with limited functionality and lack of industry standards

Your ECM needs will continue to evolve, and the technologies you implement should be flexible enough to adapt to those changes. If your existing ECM no longer meets your business needs, then it’s time to consider switching to a solution that can help maximize the value of your content.

Alfresco Cloud’s Key Capabilities

Posted by on March 15, 2013

SaaS Based Collaboration

The first aspect and most basic use of Alfresco Cloud is as a cloud hosted collaboration application for your organization.  Alfresco Cloud is multi-tenant and can host as many organizations (which Alfresco calls networks) and project spaces within each of those networks as is needed.

In the illustration below you can see two independent organizations each with several project teams working independently on the Alfresco Cloud.

 

If you need to spin up a simple collaboration environment for your department Alfresco Cloud is a great solution.  Alfresco Cloud is affordable and based on per user pricing.  There is zero software to install or setup and you get a ton of really rich collaborative features from document libraries to wikis, calendars, blogs and much more.

Cross-Organization Collaboration

Where things start to get really interesting, however, is with cross-organization.  With Alfresco Cloud you can manage content between organizations to enable B2B interactions between knowledge workers from the different organizations – again all with zero infrastructure setup.

In the illustration below you can see a project team from each organization collaborating with one another through Alfresco Cloud’s permissions which ensure that only that content which should be shared is in fact shared.

Alfresco One: Private – Public Cloud Sync

The thing is that not all content is meant to live in the cloud.  Organizations of all sizes generally have some content they still feel needs to be controlled and secured inside the firewall or as is often the case, there are integrations with critical business systems that are mandatory and those integrations are only possible between systems located within our firewalls.

With Alfresco Cloud this is no issue.  You can setup and host your own private infrastructure internally which serves as the system of record and hosts all of your content including those items which must remain internal and for content you want to collaborate on with organizations outside the firewall you can create a synchronization (using Alfresco One) with Alfresco Cloud and synchronize specific content between your organizations private infrastructure and the cloud to facilitate the collaboration.

In the illustration above we have a private infrastructure on the left and the cloud on the right. You can see that some project teams are working only against this internal infrastructure while others may work only against the cloud.   And we can see a secure, relationship between our internal infrastructure on the left with the Alfresco Cloud on the right.  This synchronization is enabling our teams to collaborate with one another regardless of whether they are working on public or private infrastructure.

Remote API for the Cloud

And finally Alfresco Cloud supports a remote application programming interface or API which is based on CMIS (Content Management Interoperability Standard) and a few additional Alfresco specific non-CMIS APIs.

This is a real game changer because it means that collaboration no longer has to take place through the user interface but as we can see here in the diagram we can enable applications and automated processes to participate in our collaborations – and because we have a sync between private a public cloud infrastructure we’re not just talking about cloud based content storage here – which is great in its own right — we also have a very powerful integration platform.

When you combine the API and the public/private sync what you gain is infrastructure akin to an integration bus.

 

 

 

Alfresco Cloud is much more than meets the eye

Posted by on February 28, 2013

As many of you know Alfresco introduced its cloud offering almost a year ago. At the time of this writing there are a number of unique ways you can interact with Alfresco Cloud:

  • Collaborative SaaS (Software as a Service) application. Teams to quickly spin up collaborative spaces (in Alfresco’s Share application) and begin working together with zero on premise software.
  • Members of the cloud can join multiple networks which enables them to work and collaborate across organizational boundaries.
  • Custom applications can use Alfresco Cloud as a store. You can interact with cloud through an API (CMIS and Alfresco specific RESTful APIS.)
  • And you can sync content between your on-premise instance of Alfresco and the networks with-in cloud that you belong to.

Share in the cloud as a SaaS offering is a pretty obvious play. There is a lot of value in this simple use case for organizations that need good collaboration tools but just don’t have the appetite for or enough user volume to justify hosting their own infrastructure.

When you combine this SaaS offering with the ability to securely and selectively collaborate with other organizations, you are now enabling all kinds of people-oriented B2B interactions that can be extremely difficult when you have a system that is stuck behind a firewall.

Add to that an API to that and now it’s not just people-oriented B2B and internal interactions that can take place, it’s automation and rich behavior.  At this point Alfresco in the cloud is no longer an application.  It’s a bus.

Now not all content was meant to live outside the firewall and not all systems can or even should live/reach outside the firewall.  With Alfresco’s “cloud sync” capability Alfresco Cloud closes this gap by allowing organizations to selectively and securely sync specific content between an on-premise instance and the cloud.  This is extremely exciting because it opens up a whole new realm of possibilities for B2B integration and mobile enablement.

If you’re thinking about Alfresco Cloud as a simple collaboration application or a simple cloud based content store it’s time to rethink.  Alfresco Cloud paired with Alfresco on premise is an extremely exciting hybrid architecture and integration middle-ware that opens up use cases which have traditionally required dedicated business to business infrastructures that were difficult to get approved let alone set up: basically not possible.

On March 14th Rivet Logic will co-host a webinar with Alfresco entitled Using Alfrescos Hybrid Cloud Architecture for Better Web Content Management where we will discuss and demonstrate how hybrid architectures can be applied in a WCM (Web Content Management) context to enable collaboration with external partners like agencies and for integrations with other content services, providers and consumers such as AP, Routers and the like.  While WCM use cases will be the focus of the conversation, the topic is perfect for anyone interested in learning more about Alfresco hybrid architectures.  See you there!

https://www.alfresco.com/events/webinars/using-alfrescos-hybrid-cloud-architecture-better-web-content-management

Web CMS and Digital Assets: Crafter Rivet / Alfresco Integration with Adobe Photoshop

Posted by on February 21, 2013

Digital assets are a key component of almost all web experience and customer engagement projects. In today’s era of engagement with all of the additional content targeting, personalization, internationalization and multi-channel publishing the number and permutation of digital assets associated with any given project are growing rapidly.  This trend will only continue as we move forward.  Content workers (authors, designers, content mangers) need to be able to create, locate, modify and manage the growing number of assets easily and efficiently in order to maintain brand quality and deliver projects on time and on budget.

In today’s blog entry we’re going to focus on the creative side of WCM (Web Content Management) and DAM (Digital Asset Management) even though this is only a small portion of the overall set of use cases.

Let’s begin by considering the following example use cases:

  • Create mobile appropriate image resolution variants
  • Create video stills
  • Imprint watermarks
  • Thumbnails for galleries and promotional kickers

Each of these use cases are important ingredients in providing the user with a great experience but they also introduce a lot of additional work for our content teams.  One of the ways to deal with the large volume of asset creation and manipulation responsibilities is to automate them.   The use cases mentioned above and many others like them are a perfect candidate for automation.

Crafter Rivet leverages Alfresco’s enterprise content management services for image transformation. With a few simple rules applied at the repository level it’s possible to provide your content team with image resolution variants, video stills, apply watermarks, to scale and crop thumbnails and then to make these assets available for review by our authors all in an automated fashion with no additional labor required beyond uploading the canonical assets.

Another important way to help our content teams cope with the sheer volume of digital asset related workload is to make sure our teams are able to work with the very best tools at their disposal.  With today’s modern browsers it is possible to provide a fairly decent set of tools / asset manipulation functionality right with-in the browser.  However, while purely web-based tools have their advantages they are often slower and much less powerful than the desktop tools serious content contributors are used to working with.

The biggest productivity boosts are gained when we empower our designers and other content workers on our team with rich, native tools that they are already familiar with and work  with on a daily basis.

Adobe’s creative suite (which contains tools like PhotoShop) is the quintessential software package for image/digital asset creation and manipulation.  Designers are deeply familiar with these tools and are able to leverage their enormous arsenal of capability to accomplish a tremendous amount of work in a short amount of time.  The issue that many organizations often face, is that while the tools themselves are great, the interfaces between the tools and the systems that ultimately store, manage and deliver the assets are either non-existent, human-process based, or have clunky integration. This gap creates a drag on the margin of productivity and introduces room for error.

Fortunately Alfresco, Adobe and Crafter Rivet Web Experience Management have a solution that connects rich, creative desktop tools,  to your systems of record (e.g. repository) and ultimately to your systems of engagement (e.g. website) in a seamless fashion.  Content creators work right with-in the rich, local tools that they are familiar and productive with and those tools are deeply integrated with the repository which means that all of the organization, policies, metadata extraction, and versioning provided by the repository etc are seamlessly integrated and enforced.  Alfresco is a CMIS (Content Management Interoperability Standard) compliant repository.  This standards based interface enables it to communicate with external applications like Adobe’s products in order to interact with and operate on the content, metadata, permissions, versions and so on housed within the repository.   Adobe provides a platform called Adobe Drive which enables its tools to connect in a rich fashion over CMIS to Alfresco.  Once we’ve connected our Adobe tools and our Alfresco repository authors working within Crafter Studio, the authoring and management component of Crafter Rivet can now see content updates coming from the Adobe tools right in context with the work they are doing through in context preview and editing. They can also interact with that content through the web based tools, workflow, versioning, metadata capture and publishing capabilities of Crafter Studio.

By closing the integration gap we can now provide powerful tools for productivity and at the same time do so in a way that makes it seamless and easy for our creative teams to collaborate across the entire process.

Click on the video below to see Adobe and Crafter Rivet WEM / Alfresco in action together!

Video of Photoshop altering images in Crafter Rivet Web CMS and Alfresco

 

Crafter Rivet is a 100% open source, java based web CMS for web experience management and customer engagement.  Learn more about Crafter Rivet at crafterrivet.org

Best Practices in Social Business Solutions

Posted by on June 12, 2012

The term “Social Business” has been generating a lot of buzz lately, and many enterprises have set the gears in motion to achieve this. However, just like many other IT initiatives, it’s important to first understand what a social business really means, the drivers behind it, how your organization can stand to benefit, and the strategies behind a successful implementation.

KMWorld‘s June Best Practices White Paper focuses on the topic of Social Business Solutions, with a collection of articles around successful ways of achieving a social business. Rivet Logic participated in this white paper with an article on open and agile social business solutions, and discusses topics including business drivers, what it means to be a social business, social business value creation, and how to open source can help achieve the goal.

The full white paper is available for download on our website, http://rivetlogic.com/resources/information-center.

Resources for Crafter Rivet – Web CMS for Alfresco 4

Posted by on April 16, 2012

Last week was a busy week for those of us working on Crafter Rivet, the WEM/WCM extension for Alfresco 4.0.  We’re extremely excited about this release and are busy scheduling events and demos as word is starting to get out!

You can download Crafter Rivet here:

If you missed our Webinar last week that was co-hosted with Alfresco you can check it out here:
http://www2.alfresco.com/Crafter0412

For existing Alfresco WCM customers on Alfresco version 2 and 3 using the AVM based solution, we’ve put together a couple of blogs to help you think about your migration to Alfresco 4 and the core repository:

For everyone who wants to learn more about this exciting and powerful open source solution for web content and experience management that sits on top of Alfresco, the world’s most open and powerful content management platform, we’re hosting a Crafter Rivet Roadshow in a city near you in May!  Come on out for content packed presentations, demonstrations, Q & A and free lunch!

Sign-up for the Crafter Rivet Roadshow here!

Crafter Roadshow Dates:

San Francisco
Tues. May 8

Los Angeles
Wed. May 9

Chicago
Tues. May 15

New York
Wed. May 16

Boston
Thur. May 17

Washington DC
Tues. May 22

Web CMS on The Alfresco Core Repository (Part 2 of 2)

Posted by on April 10, 2012

In yesterday’s post we covered the fact that Alfresco stopped selling the AVM based WCM solution to new customers.  Existing customers using the AVM based approach will continue to receive support until the AVM reaches end of life status.  New customers looking to Alfresco for WCM/WEM capabilities who read this will naturally wonder what is the approach to WCM on Alfresco.  Existing customers will want to know how to migrate off the AVM and in to Alfresco’s core repository.

As we have seen in yesterday’s post, the core repository has had the benefit of continuous innovation through which it has grown as a platform now capable of supporting use cases critical to WCM/WEM with key features like remote file deployments and form based content capture.  Along with features clearly directed at the WCM use cases, the core repository is host to an amazing array of features and capabilities that make it ideal for all manner of enterprise management, WCM/WEM included.

At Rivet Logic we have made a significant investment in a web content and experience management extension to Alfresco that we call Crafter Rivet. Crafter Rivet is a 100% open source,  full featured application that powers 100s of websites and has over 40 man years of development effort invested in it. Initially Crafter Rivet’s authoring and management capability was based on the AVM. When Alfresco made the decision to direct the full force of its innovation on the core repository we knew it was time to covert. Just released, Crafter Rivet 2.0 is 100% based on the core repository, Solr search and Actviti workflow for Alfresco 4 CE and EE.  Making the switch from the AVM to the core repository required a deep examination of our use cases and the features we would have on hand within the core repository.

Now that we have a background understanding of both the AVM and core repository features we discussed yesterday it is time to look at the use cases that the AVM was designed to address.  We will discuss the use case and how these gaps were addressed by Crafter Rivet.  Let’s get started!

Use Case: Sandboxing
As described in yesterday’s blog, sandboxing is a feature but there are use cases that drive this feature. In a Web CMS context we have times when we need to modify templates, CSS and other assets that have far reaching effects on our sites. There are three common use cases that point to sandboxing:

  • Development:  As a developer I want to work with a template, a CSS file, a JavaScript library, etc. without worrying that the bugs I will inevitably create will interfere with the rest of the teams ability to produce, manage, preview and publish content.
  • Timing: On websites of significant size and complexity, there are often times when projects are created to update the look and feel of the site.  These projects with future delivery dates need to be able to take place without interfering with daily publishing.  Further, it’s important that the project be able keep up with on-going updates to reduce the headache of last minute merges.
  • Playground:  Sometimes we just want to play.  Sandboxes allow us to enable team members to innovate and play around without fear of impacting the live website.

It’s clear that the ability to sandbox (or branch/merge) your website code base can be pretty handy. In my mind there are several key questions:

  • Is the support for this use case a “must have” for my specific environment?  How often do I run in to the use cases above?
  • What granularity of sandboxing do I need?

Many popular Web content management systems do not natively support sandboxing. In a lot of cases the need for the branch merge capability is handled through the development and deployment process. In general I think it safe to say this feature is a rather strong “nice to have” unless you have an site with look and feel components which are literally being constantly updated and where the traditional development process would add too much time to the effort.

When you do need sandboxes the next question is granularity and how sandboxes are used. The AVM UI dictates sandboxes for each user. In my experience accumulated over many Alfresco WCM engagements; is that this was too fined grained for the needs of most engagements.  Most users want to work directly in context with other users.  They need basic locking on individual assets to keep work safe during their edits but they don’t require an entirely separate and parallel universe.  The ability to create a sandbox ad-hoc for a specific purpose maps more directly to the needs we see on the ground. In other words, a sandbox is too granular but a sandbox for a project to update the look and feel of the entire site where users could work together would more aptly address the kind of needs we see.

Crafter Rivet starts with the first finding, that sandboxing is not a “must have” feature and that in-fact when it is applied it should be done so to facilitate specific projects and specific ad-hoc needs. If you look at the way we have structured our content in the core repository you will see we have left room to support one or more draft copies of the site.  In v2.0 we do not support layering in the default configuration; however, Crafter Engine, our content delivery and preview tier, is able to sit over top of multiple hierarchical stores and present them as one store much in the same way the AVM did.

Use Case: History and Reversion in a Web CMS Context
As a user, when I want to preview a version of a specific asset, let’s say a page,  I want to see the page as it was on that day. That means I want to see exactly the same components and assets (images, CSS, js etc) as they were on that given day.  This is a real challenge in the core repository because there is no native support linking assets together under a common version; each asset is individually versioned and the links between objects (associations) do not capture version.

Now to be honest, I have simplified the problem a bit to make a point.  I said that pages, for example, are compound assets and that you are always interested in seeing their dependencies at a given point in time.  This is often the case when we’re talking about images and components that are specific to the page but it’s not really the case when we’re talking about shared assets like templates, CSS, JavaScript, and shared components and shared collateral.  Think for a moment about why users want to look at and ultimately revert to previous versions of content.  They are doing so either:

  • In the short term because they have made a mistake, or
  • in the long term because they need to revert messaging to a previous point in time.

In the first instance there is likely to be no issue.  Common assets are likely going to be the same as they where at the point in time of the version.  However, in the second case, we really want to see the old content in the context of the current templates, etc.  If we revert, it’s to get the older content, but we’re going to deploy it in the context of the latest look and feel of our site.

Handling versioning in Web CMS is a must have, must do capability.

In Crafter Rivet we considered these use cases fully and drew a distinction between two types of relationships.  Those relationships which are page only  and those which are shared commonly amongst other objects in the system.  When you revert a page or any other object, those relationships which are “page only” will revert to a point in time, while other relationships that are common will continue to align to the latest version of the asset.

To accomplish this we leverage both the native versioning capability of the core repository as well as file organization and patterns.  In short, we organize page-only assets in folder structures that represent the page. Page objects are given names that are based on a hash of the object to guarantee a unique name which means in effect that the versioning of the page only object is “horizontal” in the repository. By horizontal I mean that a new file path is used rather than relying on the version store.  Shared objects like pages or other common assets are stored regularly and rely on the native versioning support.  If you revert a page you will revert to an a state where the page points to a different set of file / file paths — achieving a solution for both use cases we mentioned above.

Snapshots
There are several Web CMS use cases that could require snaphsots and version diffs.  For example, some websites have compliance related issues and thus must maintain versions of their sites so that in the event of a dispute over information communicated via the site they can easily prove what the site looked like at a particular moment in time.  The question for snapshots is:

  • Is this something your organization must have?
  • And if so, is it something that the repository has to do for you?

Our experience shows that this feature, for the general market, is a nice to have.  Most customers don’t take advantage of this capability.  When we looked at this capability in Crafter Rivet, we decided it was not important to support natively within the repository itself.  If a customer needs a snapshot every day we simply include a deployment target that would produce a snapshot.

For those wondering about snapshot rollback; our experience has shown that this particular feature is really not relevant to most customers in day to day operation.  The feature has come in handy as a mechanism for bailing out people who have made sweeping changes to a site (100s of files) and deployed them with little or no QA only to find a broken website after the fact.  In such a case, snapshotting a rollback is a life saver.  With a click of a button you can revert 100s of files.

Crafter Rivet, by design is 100% file based. In such a crisis scenario, a simple file based backup could be used to restore a Crafter Rivet based site to a former state.  In the repository, you are unlikely to desire an actual rollback.  It’s more likely that you will want to keep the broken state and simply fix what is wrong and then redeploy the working site.

Moving Forward

Alfresco v4 is an incredible platform and the move to the core repository unlocks all of that capability and innovation. Crafter Rivet is a platform that made use of all of the functionality in the AVM.  And with our new release, we made the move.  You can as well.  More importantly, if you are using the AVM with Alfresco v3 (or even V2), then Crafter Rivet is the perfect solution for your upgrade.  We can provide parity for most needs with a much better user experience that goes way beyond basic Web CMS needs with the coverage of WEM use cases like integrated analytics and reporting, native mobile application authoring, preview, and presentation, content targeting and personalization, multi-channel publishing and much more.  If you’re new customer to Alfresco looking for Web CMS solutions, Crafter Rivet is a comprehensive WCM/WEM solution, with features that rival some of the major players in the industry.

Click here to learn more about Crafter Rivet

Click here to sign up for a our webinar “Crafter Rivet – The WEM Solution for Alfresco 4″ on April 12th at 1pm

Content Management + Social Business = Social Content Management

Posted by on September 12, 2011

A recent CMSWire article noted that content management and social business are two very different technologies, and while vendors try to incorporate social business functionality into traditional ECM solutions, that there is no real effective way for a system to fill both shoes.

While traditional ECM systems are considered “systems of record”, social business tools are in a newer category of “systems of engagement“, and the differences between the two seem to be at opposite ends of the spectrum.

“These aren’t just differences of philosophy or look and feel. They extend to the software architecture itself. CMS has its roots in transactional, database-driven systems. There are no provisions for essential social constructs such as activity streams, user profiles, social feedback and reputation mechanisms, a centralized view of community activity and collaborative messaging. These capabilities come from a bottom-up design, not just slotting in some new modules or slapping a new UI on top of an existing CMS foundation. Actually, adding social features after the fact can make matters worse, creating more walled-off information that is hard to manage and search.”

To support the argument, SharePoint was used as an example, where a user survey concluded that enhancing SharePoint for Social Business could cost between $500,000 to over $1 million, with more for ongoing maintenance, and that organizations serious about social business should consider a purpose-built tool, rather than a customized SharePoint solution.

While a lot of what this article states is true, I don’t necessarily agree with the argument that the same application can’t have both traditional ECM and social business functionality, and be able to do it well. A good example is Alfresco, which has a robust content platform for building a variety of content-rich applications, along with a social user-interface for collaboration and document management. Alfresco’s focus is on a new vision of Social Content Management, which sits at the intersection of traditional ECM and Social Software, with its own social applications to the left, and a strong content repository on the right.

Social Content Management

And by focusing on this intersection of Social Content Management, users have the ability to discuss content, and then capture the results of that discussion inside an ECM solution in order to retain it and derive value from it.

So while ECM systems and Social Business solutions do serve very different purposes, it doesn’t mean the same technology platform can’t be used to satisfy both sides and be able to do it in a cohesive manner.

Alfresco Partners with Ephesoft to Offer Open Source Document Capture

Posted by on July 08, 2011

Alfresco has formed a technology partnership with Ephesoft to bring together open source document capture, enterprise content management and CMIS for intelligent PDF capture and search and workflow management.

Ephesoft’s open source cloud document capture platform enables intelligent document capture for mailroom automation solutions.

Through this partnership, enterprises can archive document metadata or kickstart document-driven business processes in their enterprise ECM through Ephesoft’s intelligence capture. Document capture will be managed through scanners, email and fax to create searchable PDFs with metadata tags. The cool part is, documents are more than just captured, but also learned, meaning Ephesoft can classify the documents and separate them from other documents while saving key data elements that enable users to send it into other business processes when needed. Beyond document capture, Ephesoft also offers scanning, classification, data extraction and document delivery.

Rivet Logic has also recently partnered with Ephesoft to provide our customers system integration services for Ephesoft.

State of the ECM Industry 2010: Promising Outlook for Open Source

Posted by on May 20, 2010

AIIM (Association for Information and Image Management), released its “State of the ECM Industry 2010″ report yesterday. This report, underwritten by Rivet Logic, surveyed over 750 members of the AIIM community and yields some interesting facts about ECM, and in particular, open source ECM.

The study revealed that open source ECM solutions are only used by 6% of organizations, along with 3% for WCM and 2% for portals. But the good news is that an additional 9% plan to adopt open source for ECM, WCM or portals within the next 2 years. Most respondents also have an open mind on open source usage, with 64% saying that they would consider it mainly due to its cost benefits.

The report also covers other ECM-related topics including ECM business drivers, SharePoint, and Enterprise 2.0.

To download a full copy of the report, click here.