Category: Digital Experience Management

Is a Digital Experience Platform (DXP) Right For My Business?

Posted by on November 03, 2017

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What is a Digital Experience Platform?

You may have heard the term “digital experience platform,” or DXP, thrown around before — either by a vendor, tech consulting company, or just by discussing how to effectively manage the customer’s online experience. There are a lot of convoluted explanations of what a DXP actually is, but we would like offer our own definition up and change that. This article will seek to define and provide examples of DXPs, as well as discuss how to know if investing in a DXP is the right move for your business.

Note: DXP is also sometimes referred to as a UXP, or user experience platform, but they’re the same thing. 

Simply put, a digital experience platform is a set of tools that allows a business to manage not only the customer’s experience, but the experience of partners, vendors, employees, suppliers, and more. It can be a software bundle, such as a suite, or a single piece of software, depending on the DXP itself. That being said, the platforms typically include software for the following:

  • Content management
  • Social media
  • Mobile website integration
  • Portal or gateway
  • Search functionality
  • Rich Internet Application tools (RIA)
  • Collaboration and meetings
  • Analytics
  • Backend management

DXPs aren’t limited to the items listed above, though. Many DXPs will include tools unique to that particular platform. Some include customizable forms, video editing, product management, and more.

It’s important to understand that a DXP is not a prepackaged platform — it’s actually the opposite. It’s a platform that allows the building and customization of meaningful applications for managing and enriching your customer’s online experience. Think of it like a massive customizable collaboration suite: it gives you the tools to customize and build it to fit your company and brand. From there, it allows management of the user experience through the company’s website and the mobile rendition of it, as well as through other channels, like email, social media, and so forth. Building a new rendition of any of those channels for the company’s employees or vendor is tied into the functionality, and each channel is managed in various backend systems as well.

The portal portion of the DXP is a “self-service” portal that allows users to sign in and manage their own set of tools and software. For example, employees could sign into their portal and find their email, CRM (Customer Relationship Management tool), documents and files, analytics, and more — all in one spot. They can also customize their portal to their heart’s desire, building it out to suit their particular needs and preferences. Each user can also be assigned a role (administrator, manager, sales, etc.), within the portal system, which tightens security and control.

Many DXPs also have the functionality to link multiple pieces of data from within the DXP together to pull analytics, increasing its capability and usefulness tenfold.

Is a DXP the Right Fit For My Business?

Now that you have a good idea of what a DXP is and what it can do, we’ll discuss deciding if investing in one is the right move for your company.

Ask the following questions at your next meeting:

  • Is your company the right size for such an extensive platform?DXPs are typically associated with larger businesses (enterprise level), but can be the right fit for medium-sized businesses under certain circumstances.
  • Does your company need a way to tie the full user experience together, giving users a way to create and customize their own portals?If you have multiple channels within your company, both from the front end and the back end (i.e., vendors, partners, customers, and multiple employee roles), a DXP might be the right fit for your company.
  • Does your company have a need to tighten analytics and span them across platforms?The analytics component of DXPs often span CRMs, social media, the company’s website, and more.

Furthermore, there are three key components to deciding if a DXP is the right move for your company. We discuss them below.

Technology Environment

The right technology fit is all about deciding what platform is the best in terms of the language the platform was programmed in. If your in-house developers are not trained in the specific language or languages the platform was developed in, they will struggle managing it. It’s wise to check and double-check this component when deciding on the right technological fit. Many DXPs are based on Java, PHP or Microsoft stacks. The language will most likely be different on the front-end, or website end, though. Many DXPs are compatible with JavaScript, CSS and HTML on the front-end, which reduces that portion of the developmental impact.

Functionality 

Even though we’ve discussed the different functionalities of DXPs, we haven’t yet touched upon how they’re typically grouped. There are three different types of DXPs, including:

  • CMS-heritage DXPs
  • Portal-heritage DXPs
  • Commerce-heritage DXPs

The best fit for the company will ultimately fall under one of these categories.

CMS-heritage DXPs are based upon just that: customizing all of the company’s online content. These platforms focus on marketing and analytics, social media, and the website across all devices. Generating interest in the company’s offerings, targeting the right audiences, and creating campaigns are the highlights of CMS-heritage DXPs. They are best suited for B2C companies with short transactions. Some offer user portals, some do not; this component can typically be an add-on cost or can be excluded.

Portal-heritage DXPs are based upon creating that unique experience for each and every user (front-end, back-end), and giving them each a log-in portal. These platforms fulfill the need for bringing the customer back after the sale and giving the salespeople what they need to keep making the sale. It allows employees to see what they need to do to maximize customer retention. It can also help with issue resolution and helpdesk scenarios.

Commerce-heritage DXPs are based almost solely upon shopping needs in an online retail environment. It is based primarily on inventory management, payment systems, and the full user shopping experience.

Budget & Cost

It goes without saying that this will be a category that the company will have to analyze forwards and backwards before jumping on board with a DXP. When talking with DXP providers, discuss costs associated with both one-time integration and set-up fees as well as ongoing licensing and operational costs. Also analyze the costs associated with possibly expanding your IT and development team, or outsourcing this component. Keep in mind that some DXPs are more affordable than others, namely open source vs. non-open source. Liferay is an example of an open source DXP, but several DXPs should be analyzed at length before choosing the right financial fit for the company.

Digital Experience Platforms: Consulting and Integration

Need more help deciding which DXP is right for your company? Give us a call. We can not only help you decide which DXP is the right fit for your company, but help you build, integrate and optimize your DXP after you decide. We have experience with industry-leading open source DXP and CMS software such as Liferay and Crafter CMS.

Streamline Customer Engagement with Digital Experiences That Deliver “Wow!”

Posted by on October 25, 2017

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Creating a “Wow!” customer experience may be the Holy Grail for marketers, but it truly is achievable when you have the right strategy and tools in place. Customers and employees today have incredibly high expectations, and if your digital marketing isn’t living up to their standards then it’s time to make a shift. The first step in exceeding your customer’s dreams is to work on internal functionality and ensure that your digital strategy and platforms are in alignment. You’re much more likely to have delighted customers when your employees are able to be effective at their daily tasks — something that can be difficult with a variety of disparate systems and legacy technology. See how pulling everything together will help you get to “Wow!” experiences for every customer.

Digital Customer Experience

How can you create an exceptional digital customer experience if you’re not aware of the various facets involved in customer satisfaction? Each time a customer interacts with your brand, they expect consistency of message, offer and interaction. This means that someone visiting your Facebook page, Twitter account and website should all see an offer that’s logical for that particular delivery method — and the same goes for customers calling your establishment. Imagine the confusion if you’re a customer who clicks through a Facebook ad that has a specific offer, yet the link sends the customer to the website homepage and the offer they wanted is nowhere in sight. This is a simple example of a poor digital experience, and one that customers are likely to repeat to their friends and family. In some instances, customers will even take to Google, Yelp, your Facebook page or tag your Twitter account in an effort to get the offer that they wanted. If the individuals responding on each channel are inconsistent in their followup messaging, it’s not inconceivable that you could lose a customer for life. There are simply too many alternatives for most businesses to take a chance on providing a poor customer experience.

Customer Experience Strategy

When you assign a strategic focus at a high level of the organization, you’re more likely to raise awareness of executives and mid-level managers or directions. When you engage at all levels of the business, it’s clear that leadership is serious about improving the overall experience for customers. With a mashup of legacy systems that may or may not work well together, IT leaders need to have a firm understanding of where the business needs to go at a strategic level before introducing additional systems. No digital strategies are the same, but many consultants recommend starting with what you can sunset: perhaps there are systems that only serve a small subset of employees or customers, or systems that are taking more time and effort to maintain with each patch that is applied. These are the low-hanging fruit that can be identified for deprecation while you look for other logical opportunities for consolidation.

Critical Execution

Even the best strategy cannot create remarkable customer experiences if execution is not there. It takes the right people in the right places — and the right partnerships — to take full advantage of the benefits that digital strategy can bring to your organization. While there may be a movement within the business to take things slowly and bring on only a small adjustment at a time, change leaders argue that transformational change happens when the organization as a whole is onboard and focused on how to drive improvements in each customer interaction. As you move through execution, monitor the change through effective monitoring of quality and remediation of any deficits.

Measuring Success

A key challenge that many customers face is ensuring that they’re using the right yardstick to measure success. With the plethora of metrics and data points available, it’s more important than ever to select actionable metrics that will improve customer engagement and happiness when they’re shifted. These analytical measures are different for each organization, but many companies find that metrics such as bounce rates, time on site and pages viewed are effective measures to optimize a website, while time on call or purchase size are good measures for call centers. However, it’s important to note that a low time on a call isn’t necessarily a good thing — this could indicate that customers are not being nurtured in the way that they could be. Each metric should be considered along with others instead of in a vacuum. It may surprise you how many organizations find that different business units are using completely different measures of success for essentially the same metric.

A trusted vendor partner can help you stay accountable to your strategy, maintaining execution timelines and helping solve for the unexpected complexities that will occur throughout the life of the project. At Rivet Logic Corporation, we target all steps leading up to customer experience to help define excellence in each interaction. Contact us to learn more.

How Digital Experience Management Differs from Content Management

Posted by on October 12, 2017

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When considering Digital Experience Management and Content Management, it’s best to have a concrete definition of both terms to fully understand how they differ.

What is digital experience?

Digital experience includes a number of things, including communications, processes and products from every digital aspect that engages an audience. This includes wearables, use of the web and mobile devices, beacons and recognition. The information gathered is analyzed to provide insight into customer relationships, identity, and intentions as they interact with businesses and organizations. This helps determine how companies deliver these digital experiences for their customers for future success.

What is content management?

Content management is also known as CM or CMS. It involves the collection, acquisition, editing, tracking, access and delivery of both structured and unstructured digital information. This content includes business records, financial data, customer service data, images, video, marketing information and other digital information.

With content management, you create and manage content, finding ways to generate awareness across multiple channels to reach more people. While having content is good, it’s more about offering the entire “experience” to the user that will give them more enhanced, enriched engagement. Content Management Systems have continuously evolved, integrating contextual digital experiences. This requires a comprehensive and effective strategy, the right tools, the right approach, and most of all, the right technology. An optimal digital experience embraces all these elements to provide personalized, responsive, and consistent experiences for every user you engage.

How is this done?

Digital experience (DX) management works in conjunction with content management, but is more comprehensive and fulfilling to the user. Think about the different outlets that engage customers – websites, social media, microsites, text messages, mobile apps and more. All these elements offer a complete digital experience. The processes and technology that provide these customized, consistent experiences is the management of it all.

One of the best ways they differ is that in digital experience management, the distribution channels all have objectives to follow and limitations. These help drive specific requirements for content and how to manage it. For instance, your tone and CTA will be different based on the digital platform you use. Additionally, when interacting with content, users want personalized experiences based on analytics you have determined appropriate for that channel. This allows them to seamlessly interact within that experience.

Web publishing used to be the first line of engagement, but not anymore There are too many channels users interact with that require ways in which publishers can gather feedback to quickly adjust their content. Without this management model in place, the system will not work.

Tools of the trade

There are a number of tools and systems to manage the digital experience. There are options for advanced analytics, to enhanced marketing tools that manage content based on channel. There’s also an emerging breed of Digital Experience Platforms (DXP), which provide businesses with an architecture for delivering consistent and connected customer experiences across channels, while gathering valuable insight and digitizing business operations.

When you have systems that work well together, being able to track successes becomes easier. When determining which tools will work best, you may want to start with product mapping. As a basis, the digital experience tool should include a combination of inbound marketing automation, analytics, and content management. Getting a system developed to meet all your needs is key.

As different avenues of engagement now drive the customer experience rather than the web, delivering a comprehensive and holistic experience is key. The digital experience is more complete, diverse and authentic – future thinking, while integrating content is how it should be done.

11 Reasons Why You Should Upgrade to Liferay 6.2

Posted by on May 28, 2014

A few months ago, Liferay released the latest version of their portal, version 6.2. This version delivers enhanced usability and provides a comprehensive platform for building intuitive, engaging digital experiences for both employee-facing and customer-facing applications. While previous versions of Liferay had primarily focused on backend enhancements, version 6.2 turns the spotlight on the user experience, a crucial capability that many organizations seek in today’s era of customer and employee engagement.

Liferay Portal 6.2’s feature enhancements can be broken into two categories: 1) Usability and Administration, and 2) Development. Usability and Administration enhancements would primarily benefit organizational employees and end users. Development enhancements, on the other hand, would provide extra flexibility for developers, enabling them to be more creative when it comes to customizations and new portlet development efforts, resulting in faster time to market and better efficiency for bug fixes. In short, Liferay 6.2’s wide variety of new features has many organizational benefits across the board.

With everything that Liferay 6.2 has to offer, we highly encourage an upgrade, and have compiled a list of the 11 most useful new features in a white paper. The most talked about and anticipated new feature in Liferay 6.2 is undoubtedly its enhancement for mobile support, which by itself is enough reason to upgrade. However, the rest of the features in this list will also positively impact organizational users, administrators, and developers in various ways, helping to make a stronger case for an upgrade.

To download the full white paper, click here.

What’s in Store for Digital Experience Management in 2014

Posted by on January 13, 2014

2014 is here in full swing, and promises to be an exciting year as the web continues to evolve and new products and trends continue to disrupt the industry.

In 2013, we saw the continued rise of mobile and the age of the customer, where enterprises worldwide re-evaluated strategies to optimally engage with their customers in this digital era. As mobile devices continue to proliferate and have become the new norm, consumers have increasingly higher expectations of the right content delivered to them when and how they want it, resulting in customer experience management skyrocketing to the top of every organization’s priority list.

However, experience management doesn’t just apply to customers, but instead extends to include all organizational stakeholders – customers, employees, partners, etc. We also saw organizations take a closer look internally and focus their efforts on employee community building. Realizing that workplace environments are changing, with a greater need for enterprise collaboration now than ever before, companies are implementing social intranet solutions that offer dynamic and social environments to facilitate community and collaboration.

In addition, many organizations are also building web-based social communities for their external stakeholders for further engagement to improve customer relations and build brand loyalty.

Tackling these daunting digital experience management tasks require careful planning and execution. Organizations need to first determine their business strategies and goals and take the time to really understand their audience to formulate the right messaging. A well thought out strategy sets the right foundation to build your systems – customer experience management, social intranet, customer portal, etc. – upon. The technology should be an enabler of your goals and facilitate your business users to effectively carry out your business objectives.

At Rivet Logic, we believe that software should be agile systems that can easily be customized to fit each organization’s unique needs. There’s no one-size-fits-all tool, and your underlying system must be flexible and developer friendly to allow various customizations and integrations with other existing enterprise applications. In addition, your system must be user friendly for business users. As we’ve seen over the past few years, there’s been a shift from IT to Marketing as Marketing’s responsibilities have expanded to include multi-channel web content management, customer experience management, and more. The tools we employ must be easy to use for non-technical business users.

In 2014 we’ll continue to see these trends evolve. Organizations will continue to put a large emphasis on customer experience management and creating a seamless omni-channel experience as mobile continues to grow. Businesses will also focus more on big data. The explosive growth of social media and mobile devices has generated an enormous amount of user behavioral data that can be harnessed to provide organizations with valuable insight on how to better address the needs of their customers and employees.